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Rhetoretician -- Fiction etc.

Data for Horcrux Analysis

Data for Horcrux Analysis

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M31

 

antosha_c  has initiated a conversation about a partial horcrux theory.

I thought I'd add some additional data to help the analysis:


 

Here goes

Horcrux
Diary
Ring
Locket
Cup
Diadem
Harry
Nagini
Order Made
1
2
4
3
5
6
7
Yr Made
1943
1944
1950?
1950?
1970
1981
1994
Murder of
Myrtle
TR Sr.
Muggle Tramp
H Smith
Albanian peasant
Lily, attempt on Harry
Bertha
Significance to LV
Proof of Heir
Family Heirloom
Slytherin's
Hufflepuff's
Ravenclaw's
Accident
Rebirth
Other Powers & Signif
Opens chamber; hurts Ginny
Recalls the dead; kills Dumbledore
Attacks Ron
Unknown
Gives wisdom
Destroys LV body; takes LV power
Kills Snape
Composition
Paper
Stone
Gold
Gold
Gold?
Living
Living
Order Destroyed
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Yr Destroyed
1993
1996
1997
1998
1998
1998
1998
Age when destroyed
50
500?
1000
1000
1000
17
10?
Place Destroyed
Chamber
Gaunt Shack
Forest
of Dean
Chamber
Room of Rqt
Forbidden Forest
Great Hall
Method of destruction
Basilisk fang
Sword
Sword
Basilisk fang
Fire
AK curse
Sword
Destroyer
Harry
Dumbledore
Ron
Hermione
Crabbe
Voldemort
Neville



Now, in this context, led me point out the most obvious combinations of seven to which the horcruxes might refer:

·        The seven ancient celestial bodies (Sun, Moon, Venus, Mars, Mercury, Jupiter, Saturn).
·        The seven days of the week.
·        The seven virtues.
·        The seven deadly sins.
·        The seven wonders of the world.
·        The seven Gods of Luck.



Go to it.

  • I was thinking along the lines of the seven ages of man from As You Like It:

    And one man in his time plays many parts,
    His acts being seven ages. At first the infant,
    Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms;
    Then the whining school-boy, with his satchel
    And shining morning face, creeping like snail
    Unwillingly to school. And then the lover,
    Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad
    Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier,
    Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard,
    Jealous in honour, sudden and quick in quarrel,
    Seeking the bubble reputation
    Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice,
    In fair round belly with good capon lin'd,
    With eyes severe and beard of formal cut,
    Full of wise saws and modern instances;
    And so he plays his part. The sixth age shifts
    Into the lean and slipper'd pantaloon,
    With spectacles on nose and pouch on side;
    His youthful hose, well sav'd, a world too wide
    For his shrunk shank; and his big manly voice,
    Turning again toward childish treble, pipes
    And whistles in his sound. Last scene of all,
    That ends this strange eventful history,
    Is second childishness and mere oblivion;
    Sans teeth, sans eyes, sans taste, sans everything."



    Baby:
    Childhood:
    The lover:
    The soldier:
    The successful man:
    Old age:
    Mental dementia and death:

    I don't know if it works with the order he made those things - but TR seems to have gone through a lot of those stages (not the lover, though) Just some more thoughts to go with your chart.
  • Oops, actually the ring was destroyed in the Headmaster's Office, not the Gaunt shack.
  • Wow! You sure took that and ran with it!

    Some other sevens:

    • Seven hills of Rome (and San Francisco...)
    • The Seven Pleiades
    • The seven seas (sometimes listed as the Adriatic Sea, Aegean Sea, Black Sea, Caspian Sea, Ionian Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Atlantic/Ocean)
    • In Sumerian myth, Innana passes through seven gates on her descent into the underworld
    • The number of "planets" visible to the naked eye (Sun, Moon, Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, Saturn)
    • Classical Greece, India and China each had a venerable group called the Seven Sages
    • In Islam, there are seven heavens—and seven hells
    • In British folklore, the gates to Faeirie open every seven years
    • In Judaism, the name of God, Yahweh, is numerologically 70... (Judaism stresses the seventh, rather than the seven—so you get the Sabbath and the Sabbatical, and the Jubilee every seven Sabbaticals...)
    • There are seven players on a Quidditch team


    I wonder if the one that fits best though might not be the seven chakras:

    • 1—Base of Spine (survival/fear): Destroying the diary is all about pure survival for Harry (and Ginny, of course, but she's not the hero here!)
    • 2—Genitals (desire/lust) Well... The ring doesn't make much sense here—it makes more as the third chakra. Nor does DD seem to be someone who is struggling with lust... Still...
    • 3—Below the Navel (power) I think it makes sense to put the cup here (in creation rather than destruction order); it's an object of power (though we never find out its attributes) and Hermione struggles mightily with concepts of personal power
    • 4—The Heart (love/hatred) Ah! Perfect! The locket is carried at the heart and engenders hatred and mistrust. Ron's challenge is to listen to his heart—which he finally does in destroying the locket.
    • 5—The Throat (truth/lies) "Wit beyond measure..." is precisely what Crabbe lacks. Therefore destroying the Horcrux destroys him! (And Harry's carrying it at his shoulder)
    • 6—The Third Eye (awakening) Well, where was Harry's scar again? And what happened to Harry (and to Voldemort) when Voldy destroyed it?
    • 7—The Crown (englightenment) Neville faces death, reaches out to a higher power (the hat on his head—as Harry did to destroy #1) and receives the weapon wherewith to destroy the serpent of illusion—the serpent that is "in essence divided" and to reduce Voldemort to unity once again. Hmmm.
  • Oooh, great analysis, great comments! There are a lot of sevens, and linking the horcruces to the chakras makes such sense. I've reaped incredible benefits from Caroline Myss' work with the seven chakras and how they speak about the same as the seven sacraments, the seven levels of the tree of life, the seven roads to God... There are seven directions, too - east, south, west, north, above, below, within. Is it any wonder I feel blessed to live in house no. 7?

    How I'd love to ask dear JKR if this was a conscious choice or if it just worked out that way.

    I don't think Myrtle is Horcrux no. 1, though. Doesn't it have to be a willed murder to make a horcrux? I thought Myrtle's death was completely accidental - she just saw those big eyes... Which makes it clear that it wasn't even TR who killed her - it was the basilisk.
    • Hi Berte!

      JKR said that Myrtle was the relevant murder for the first Horcrux in her live chat today. Otherwise I'm not sure I'd've mentioned it. (But he clearly made the Horcrux contemporaneously with the opening of the Chamber, and hers was the only relevant death, so that didn't leave too many choices...)
  • I thought it was the basilisk that did in Myrtle. Poor kid,back int eh 40's was feeling sorry for herself and didn't see where she was going and....

    You can just about apply 7 to anything you want. Humans love the number 7. I would take a better interest if animals took up the number. You could throw in any number and interesting things would come up.
  • Just to be, you know, precise... Nagini was not killed in the Great Hall but on the grounds of Hogwarts outside the doors to the entrance hall.
  • Don't know if you've already seen these, but:
    Too many sevens
    • Yes, I did, thanks! It bears some (not all) of the responsibility for getting my hopes up a bit too high for Ginny's role in Deathly Hallows, but that's okay. It's really a nice piece of work.
  • Erm - The Ring was destroyed in Dumbledore's office, Phineas saw him do it.
  • Okay, I want to play! Being quite keen on the inversions idea, I'll put this one forward. Look up at Rhetoretician's list and see how the list of horcrux destroyers pairs up - 1 & 7 - Harry and Neville, the boys of the prophecy; 2 & 6 - Dumbledore & Voldemort, great good vs. great evil; 3 & 5 - Ron and Crabbe - Harry's sidekick vs. Draco's sidekick; And Hermione at the center with the cup - Just as another cup was at the center of book four.
    • That's a great observation, and I love the symmetry. But now you have to account for why it's Hermione who's at the center. My first thought would have been to put Harry or Voldemort at the center. So now give us a theory of Hr-Centrality. :)
  • Horcruxes are a 7-course feast

    My dears, while that Horcrux summary is great, how misguided the theories! Do you not see - is it not obvious? The Horcruxes can only be properly interpreted as the 7 courses of a scrumptious feast!

    And as I don't want to clog someone else's journal with my deep and rather complex analysis, if you're interested, read more here:

    Horcruxes explained by the rules of haute cuisine
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