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Rhetoretician -- Fiction etc.

Ten Ways

Ten Ways

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Mother Ginevra
A meme I got (I believe that the technical LJ term is "gacked") from minisinoo.

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Ten Ways to Tell You're Reading a Story by Rhetoretician:

  1. It's probably short, less than 12,000 words altogether.
  2. Despite being short, there's a fair chance it's divided into three parts.
  3. There are lots of concrete descriptions of sights, sounds, smells, textures.
  4. If it's an HP story, Hermione is probably in it somewhere.
  5. Even if it's an HP story, it's devoid of teenage stupidity.
  6. One part of the story takes place decades, if not centuries, if not millenia, after another part of the story.
  7. Somebody dies.
  8. Somebody else is heartbroken.
  9. You're reaching for a tissue by the last page.
  10. You feel really good about the fact that you're crying.

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  • All very true. Especially that last one. ;-)

    And I think that the first few times I tried to use the word gack, I used cack instead. Fortunately, my flist at the time were very forgiving, and I don't think that there were any Yiddish speakers among them.
  • *snort* Know no Yiddish, but found a dictionary. *grins* Ignorance is bliss... ;)
  • But 'cack' is a good Northern word we learned from our Viking forebears... ;)
    • I thought it was of Greek origin - kakos meaning bad.
      • I don't doubt it. :) It also occurs in areas of th old Danelaw, (Lancashire, Yorkshire), and is derived from cac; shit. The privy being known as the cac-hus. The term was still in use when my father was a child, hence hearing someone's mother call, "Get down the yard and don't come back 'til you've cacka-ed!"

        It also exists in Scottish Gaelic as 'cac', same meaning, and there's also the Latin 'caco'. I'm led to believe it's also an Indian word which gave rise to 'khaki', the colour of the army uniform. The derivation of language is a fascinating thing to me. :)
  • Thanks, David. *snort* about the linguistic faux pas.
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